How to Set Your Outsourced Lead Generation Program Up for Success (pt 1)

Posted by Dan McDade

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on May 28, 2015 10:38:00 AM

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I’m always pleased when a prospect asks, “What can I do to help ensure my program’s success?” It’s a great question. It shows they want a collaborative, win-win relationship—not a “vendor under my thumb” relationship. (Those kinds of relationships really suck.)

As an outsourced lead generation company, one of the ways we can best serve our clients is to offer insight on what they can do to maximize the results from their program. After all … we’ve seen it all.

Over ten years ago I put together a comprehensive list of the top reasons outsourced lead generation programs fail. Recently, my COO reminded me that I gave her this list on her first day with the company and said she still refers to it today. Some of the principles on that list are specific to the vendor side and have naturally been woven into the philosophy that drives our company and play an active role in our day-to-day dynamics with clients. But some of them fall squarely on the client’s shoulders and can make or break a program. And for that reason, I’d like to share those concepts with you.

I’ve broken down the information into a 3-part blog series—with each part addressing one of three critical steps you must take to set your lead generation program up for success:

Part I: Executive sponsorship and periodic reinforcement

Part II: Participation in planning & training

Part III: Expectations for ongoing success: marketing and sales accountability

Let’s dive right in to our first topic.

Part I: Executive sponsorship and periodic reinforcement

Before engaging with any lead generation company, it’s extremely important that there is agreement within your organization to prioritize the program. As with most things, this mindset must originate from the top. I cannot stress this enough. Executives set the tone. They set the pace.

How can they accomplish this? Executives must set the expectations for sales and marketing to:

  • Provide necessary materials and related data: This can vary depending on what a particular vendor needs to be successful. (For example: Sales process information, updated client lists, active opportunities, messaging, etc.) The important thing is that the information is current and detailed.
  • Actively participate in regular meetings: Ideally, any sales rep that has received a lead since the prior meeting should be present and ready to discuss updates, new information, etc.
  • Follow up on leads and provide specific, relevant feedback: For PointClear clients, we provide lead follow-up best practices. This allows our clients to respond with appropriate, thorough and timely information.

It’s not enough for executives to simply give the go-ahead and move on to the next thing on their list. Success begins at the top, and executives must demonstrate their commitment to stay involved by continuing to check in, get updates on progress, etc.

Once you have full executive endorsement, it’s time to move on to planning and training. In the next article I’ll share how to make the most of this stage of the program.

Stay tuned for part 2!


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Topics: Lead Generation


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